Shape the Regional Growth Strategy

Share Shape the Regional Growth Strategy on Facebook Share Shape the Regional Growth Strategy on Twitter Share Shape the Regional Growth Strategy on Linkedin Email Shape the Regional Growth Strategy link

Consultation has concluded


RGS Update is Complete!

Thank you to those who participated in the public engagement process!

Fraser Valley Future 2050 was adopted by the FVRD Board on April 25, 2024. The plan maintains a shared vision for the future, informed by considerable engagement with residents, member municipalities, First Nations, the Province, and neighbouring regional districts.

The updated Regional Growth Strategy includes a greater emphasis on climate action, collaboration among all levels of government, and is a better reflection of the needs, contributions, and significance of the many First Nations whose territories the FVRD is located within.

Some of the more significant updates made to the RGS, aim to:

  • Improve collaboration across all levels of government;
  • Respect the rights, culture, and self-governance of First Nations communities;
  • Include the interests of Indigenous Peoples and local First Nation Communities;
  • Improve regional transit and transportation infrastructure;
  • Expand public transit and active transportation networks;
  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions produced in the region;
  • Expanded policies on housing choice and affordability and homelessness; and
  • Improve preparation and response to frequent climate emergencies.

RGS implementation is already underway and will continue to be implemented through ongoing collaboration with member municipalities, adjacent regional districts, the Province, Indigenous communities, other agencies, and the public.


About the Project

The Fraser Valley is growing fast and we need an updated strategy that works for everyone. The FVRD is updating its Regional Growth Strategy (RGS) to reflect new legislation, growing relationships with Indigenous communities, and new challenges facing the region.

Fraser Valley Future 2050 is a high-level policy plan to help guide long-term growth in the region. It covers a wide range of topics, all of which are interconnected, and considers transit, housing, parks, and natural areas, economic development, and environmental issues from a regional perspective.

Regional districts use monitoring programs as part of RGS implementation. The 2023 RGS Monitoring Report and RGS Monitoring website provide important information and context through the evaluation of over thirty indicators based on RGS goals and policies.


What We Heard

Engagement for this project on Have Your Say has now concluded.

From August 3 to October 8, 2021, the FVRD heard from almost 400 residents, employees, business owners, and visitors as part of the public engagement for Phase 2 of the Regional Growth Strategy update, Fraser Valley Future 2050. Check out the public engagement results in this report.


Want to Learn More?


RGS Update is Complete!

Thank you to those who participated in the public engagement process!

Fraser Valley Future 2050 was adopted by the FVRD Board on April 25, 2024. The plan maintains a shared vision for the future, informed by considerable engagement with residents, member municipalities, First Nations, the Province, and neighbouring regional districts.

The updated Regional Growth Strategy includes a greater emphasis on climate action, collaboration among all levels of government, and is a better reflection of the needs, contributions, and significance of the many First Nations whose territories the FVRD is located within.

Some of the more significant updates made to the RGS, aim to:

  • Improve collaboration across all levels of government;
  • Respect the rights, culture, and self-governance of First Nations communities;
  • Include the interests of Indigenous Peoples and local First Nation Communities;
  • Improve regional transit and transportation infrastructure;
  • Expand public transit and active transportation networks;
  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions produced in the region;
  • Expanded policies on housing choice and affordability and homelessness; and
  • Improve preparation and response to frequent climate emergencies.

RGS implementation is already underway and will continue to be implemented through ongoing collaboration with member municipalities, adjacent regional districts, the Province, Indigenous communities, other agencies, and the public.


About the Project

The Fraser Valley is growing fast and we need an updated strategy that works for everyone. The FVRD is updating its Regional Growth Strategy (RGS) to reflect new legislation, growing relationships with Indigenous communities, and new challenges facing the region.

Fraser Valley Future 2050 is a high-level policy plan to help guide long-term growth in the region. It covers a wide range of topics, all of which are interconnected, and considers transit, housing, parks, and natural areas, economic development, and environmental issues from a regional perspective.

Regional districts use monitoring programs as part of RGS implementation. The 2023 RGS Monitoring Report and RGS Monitoring website provide important information and context through the evaluation of over thirty indicators based on RGS goals and policies.


What We Heard

Engagement for this project on Have Your Say has now concluded.

From August 3 to October 8, 2021, the FVRD heard from almost 400 residents, employees, business owners, and visitors as part of the public engagement for Phase 2 of the Regional Growth Strategy update, Fraser Valley Future 2050. Check out the public engagement results in this report.


Want to Learn More?

Consultation has concluded

Do you have a question about the project? Ask away. 

Submit your question and one of our project team members will respond. You may submit as many questions as you like. However, please stick to one topic or a single question per submission.  

  • Share Why does the draft RGS, in relation to climate change in section 8, only set a per capita target for ghg reduction, and not a target for ghg for the region as a whole? While a 50% per capita reduction by 2050, in compared to 2007, is certainly praiseworthy, will the anticipated population increase for the area result effectively result in no total regional reduction in ghg? And is that the intention of the FVRD? Regardless of the intention of the FVRD, I think this section of the RGS, for the sake of clarity, should also include total regional ghg projections that allow for expected population growth. on Facebook Share Why does the draft RGS, in relation to climate change in section 8, only set a per capita target for ghg reduction, and not a target for ghg for the region as a whole? While a 50% per capita reduction by 2050, in compared to 2007, is certainly praiseworthy, will the anticipated population increase for the area result effectively result in no total regional reduction in ghg? And is that the intention of the FVRD? Regardless of the intention of the FVRD, I think this section of the RGS, for the sake of clarity, should also include total regional ghg projections that allow for expected population growth. on Twitter Share Why does the draft RGS, in relation to climate change in section 8, only set a per capita target for ghg reduction, and not a target for ghg for the region as a whole? While a 50% per capita reduction by 2050, in compared to 2007, is certainly praiseworthy, will the anticipated population increase for the area result effectively result in no total regional reduction in ghg? And is that the intention of the FVRD? Regardless of the intention of the FVRD, I think this section of the RGS, for the sake of clarity, should also include total regional ghg projections that allow for expected population growth. on Linkedin Email Why does the draft RGS, in relation to climate change in section 8, only set a per capita target for ghg reduction, and not a target for ghg for the region as a whole? While a 50% per capita reduction by 2050, in compared to 2007, is certainly praiseworthy, will the anticipated population increase for the area result effectively result in no total regional reduction in ghg? And is that the intention of the FVRD? Regardless of the intention of the FVRD, I think this section of the RGS, for the sake of clarity, should also include total regional ghg projections that allow for expected population growth. link

    Why does the draft RGS, in relation to climate change in section 8, only set a per capita target for ghg reduction, and not a target for ghg for the region as a whole? While a 50% per capita reduction by 2050, in compared to 2007, is certainly praiseworthy, will the anticipated population increase for the area result effectively result in no total regional reduction in ghg? And is that the intention of the FVRD? Regardless of the intention of the FVRD, I think this section of the RGS, for the sake of clarity, should also include total regional ghg projections that allow for expected population growth.

    Hugh asked over 2 years ago

    Many of the goals and policies in the RGS are tied to climate change mitigation and GHG reduction, including but not limited to creating compact communities and encouraging the use of alternative modes of transportation.  Per capita GHG emissions helps provide context when calculating total GHG emissions and tracking change over time.   

    Since the targets were originally developed several years ago there have been significant policy changes at the provincial and federal levels that address both transportation and building sources of GHGs.  The province is aggressively moving to reduce carbon pollution with initiatives that include, among other things, the electrification of BC Transit’s fleets, the introduction of the Energy Step Code and a recently announced electrification plan which will promote switching from fossil fuels to clean electric energy.  Over time these policies and programs will improve local government’s ability to reduce GHG’s in the region but they have not been built into our modelling.  

    We are considering a policy to update the RGS GHG emissions targets and modelling, which may include developing a total emissions target for the region as a whole.  This work will be part of an RGS implementation program that will be undertaken after completion of the RGS update. 

  • Share As a farmer in Dewdney on Nicomen Island I would like to ask if there is a plan for upgrading the Nicomen Island Dyke system from the current sub standard level they are at ? We have been told many times that we live behind the weakest dykes in the FVRD and have been close to flood evacuation several times over the last 10 years and yet nothing ever seems to be done. There are a lot of people and animals on the island today and finding a place to go for livestock in particular is very difficult (I had nowhere to take my animals the last time). Also worth noting is that Hwy 7 goes directly through the island and it would make sense to protect that major transportation route. Thankyou! on Facebook Share As a farmer in Dewdney on Nicomen Island I would like to ask if there is a plan for upgrading the Nicomen Island Dyke system from the current sub standard level they are at ? We have been told many times that we live behind the weakest dykes in the FVRD and have been close to flood evacuation several times over the last 10 years and yet nothing ever seems to be done. There are a lot of people and animals on the island today and finding a place to go for livestock in particular is very difficult (I had nowhere to take my animals the last time). Also worth noting is that Hwy 7 goes directly through the island and it would make sense to protect that major transportation route. Thankyou! on Twitter Share As a farmer in Dewdney on Nicomen Island I would like to ask if there is a plan for upgrading the Nicomen Island Dyke system from the current sub standard level they are at ? We have been told many times that we live behind the weakest dykes in the FVRD and have been close to flood evacuation several times over the last 10 years and yet nothing ever seems to be done. There are a lot of people and animals on the island today and finding a place to go for livestock in particular is very difficult (I had nowhere to take my animals the last time). Also worth noting is that Hwy 7 goes directly through the island and it would make sense to protect that major transportation route. Thankyou! on Linkedin Email As a farmer in Dewdney on Nicomen Island I would like to ask if there is a plan for upgrading the Nicomen Island Dyke system from the current sub standard level they are at ? We have been told many times that we live behind the weakest dykes in the FVRD and have been close to flood evacuation several times over the last 10 years and yet nothing ever seems to be done. There are a lot of people and animals on the island today and finding a place to go for livestock in particular is very difficult (I had nowhere to take my animals the last time). Also worth noting is that Hwy 7 goes directly through the island and it would make sense to protect that major transportation route. Thankyou! link

    As a farmer in Dewdney on Nicomen Island I would like to ask if there is a plan for upgrading the Nicomen Island Dyke system from the current sub standard level they are at ? We have been told many times that we live behind the weakest dykes in the FVRD and have been close to flood evacuation several times over the last 10 years and yet nothing ever seems to be done. There are a lot of people and animals on the island today and finding a place to go for livestock in particular is very difficult (I had nowhere to take my animals the last time). Also worth noting is that Hwy 7 goes directly through the island and it would make sense to protect that major transportation route. Thankyou!

    Will asked almost 3 years ago

    Thank you for your question.  The diking and drainage system on Nicomen Island is owned and operated by the Nicomen Island Improvement District (NIID).  The FVRD cannot speak on behalf of NIID and what their plans may be, however, it is apparent that funding from senior levels of government is required to raise and widen the dikes to meet the provincial standard.  The FVRD did receive $10.5M from the Province to administer on behalf of NIID a series of upgrades to their infrastructure. These works are currently being planned or are under design and will be built in the coming years.